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President Trump, Chancellor Merkel and IMF Chief Lagarde at the Quebec G7 summit

U.S. security policy toward Europe: The next phase

  • Transatlantic frictions were on display at the G7 summit, but appearances can deceive
  • The Trump administration’s underlying security commitment to Europe remains strong
  • Yet disagreements on missile defense, Iran, tariffs and EU politics won’t be easily resolved

One of the most frequently asked questions about American foreign policy following the election of President Donald J. Trump was what it planned to do about Europe. On the campaign trail, the candidate’s remarks were jarring, confusing and contradictory. His first year in office provided a sharp contrast, as representatives of the new administration did much to reassure Europe of the United States’ commitment to NATO and transatlantic security. But that did little to clarify where Washington planned to take the relationship in the future.

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Dr. James Jay Carafano
Washington’s real aim is to use the tariffs as an instrument to exact more reciprocity in trade
read more about it in the report
What's inside
  • Transatlantic frictions were on display at the G7 summit, but appearances can deceive
  • The Trump administration’s underlying security commitment to Europe remains strong
  • Yet disagreements on missile defense, Iran, tariffs and EU politics won’t be easily resolved
Who will benefit?
  • Report is targeted to the decision makers in cross country manufacturing – suppliers, manufacturers, logistics.
  • Also considered useful for the administrative university facilities, to better understand the possibe effects of current decisions.
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