Protesters occupy the parliament building in Baghdad to demand reform

Iraq: between democracy and failed state

  • Sunni and Shia is no longer the main dividing line in Iraq
  • Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr is now a key ally of non-sectarian reformers
  • Deadlock in Baghdad could help dictatorial ex-Premier Nouri al-Maliki return to power
  • Any positive scenario is contingent on an agreement with the Kurds to retake Mosul

Iraq is one of the very few countries in the Middle East and North Africa that regularly hold competitive elections. Yet the civil war of 2006, Shia and Sunni insurgencies against occupation forces, and subsequent terrorist activity all gave the impression of Iraq as a failed state. As a result, the world lost interest in the fate of Iraqi democracy. Leaving the country alone with its political inexperience inevitably led to setbacks, wasting opportunities to create a decentralized federal state.

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 Witold Repetowicz
The common perception is that elections are meaningless because the U.S. and Iran are calling the shots
read more about it in the report
What's inside
  • Sunni and Shia is no longer the main dividing line in Iraq
  • Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr is now a key ally of non-sectarian reformers
  • Deadlock in Baghdad could help dictatorial ex-Premier Nouri al-Maliki return to power
  • Any positive scenario is contingent on an agreement with the Kurds to retake Mosul
Who will benefit?
  • Report is targeted to the decision makers in cross country manufacturing – suppliers, manufacturers, logistics.
  • Also considered useful for the administrative university facilities, to better understand the possibe effects of current decisions.
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